Google’s Employee Turnover Rate Seems Staggeringly High. Here’s Why That’s Great For Employees-and Possibly Even for Google

If I were a software engineer, I would probably want to work at Google. Smart people to work with – at one point, about 16% of the company’s employees had Ph. Interesting projects to work on – Google spends 15% of its revenue on research and development. Focus on leadership development – ​​Google has spent years uncovering the traits of great managers.

For the right people, Google seems like the real deal.

However, a recent study conducted by Resume.io found that the average tenure of a Google employee is just 1.3 years, making them one of the top 10 companies where employees seem to be. do not want to stay.

That’s right, that’s not unusual for technology and software companies. The average tenure at Zoom is also 1.3 years. Reddit’s average tenure is 1.2 years. Meta (Facebook) average is 1.7 years. Work for a big name, even for a short amount of time, and it’s a lot easier to land a great job at a smaller company or startup.

“Rented by Google” is definitely a sign of approval that opens the door.

Maybe that’s one reason Google has taken a thoughtful approach to hybrid and remote work schedules: Allowing teams to determine the best way to work, while being purposeful and intentional. target on their time, and your employees are more likely to want to stay.

So what should Google do to increase the average employee’s tenure?

More importantly, what should friend What if your employee turnover rate is high?

You could be the problem. (This is one way of saying it.)

But hopefully that’s not the case for you or Google. (Google has a 4.5 out of 5 rating on Glassdoor.) More than likely that’s the nature of your market or industry.

If that’s the case, accept the fact that many of your employees will work short-term instead of long-term. See it as an opportunity, rather than a challenge.

Relatively high turnover for the right reasons – growth, learning opportunities, higher wages, etc. – is a good thing for your employees.

And maybe for you. Instead of thinking of a team as a steady collection of individuals, think of a team with a rotating cast of talent, all working together to advance your goals.

New employees bring energy, enthusiasm and ideas. Different opinion. Different experiences.

As Le Bernardin co-owner and executive chef Eric Ripert says:

In our industry, there is a tradition of having young people pass by the restaurant. They provide energy, hard work, and commitment to their mentor. We know their goal is ultimately to fulfill their dreams and manage their own kitchen as chefs. We know they will likely compete with us, but we don’t see that as a threat. We see that as a positive thing.

Competition is a blessing. We have learned not to fear it but to exploit it. It motivates us and makes us want to be better.

Certainly, those who might not stay forever

Because you will never be able to get people to stay.

But you can get the best out of them, and wishing them well after their time with you has helped position them better to pursue their own dreams.

The opinions expressed herein by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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